Q – Quintus Ennius

Quintus Ennius circa 239 – 169BC was a writer and poet born around during the Roman Republic. He is often considered to be the ‘Father of Roman poetry’.

He served as a centurian during the Second Punic Wars and was later taken to Rome where he worked both as a teacher of Greek and adapting Greek plays.

 

‘To open his lips is crime in a plain citizen’

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‘The idle mind knows not what it wants’

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‘He who has two languages has two souls’

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‘That is true liberty, which bears a pure and firm breast’

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‘Don’t ask of your friends what you yourself can do’

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‘They hate whom they fear’

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‘Let no one weep for me, or celebrate my funeral with mourning; for I still live, as I pass to and fro through the mouths of men’

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‘Whom men fear they hate, and whom they hate, they wish dead’

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‘He whose wisdom cannot help him, gets no good from being wise’

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‘A true friend is trusted in adversity’

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‘He who civilly shows the way to one who has missed it, is as one who has lighted another’s lamp from his own lamp; it none the less gives light to himself when it burns for the other’

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‘A sure friend is known in unsure circumstances’

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‘No one regards what is before his feet; we all gaze at the stars’

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‘Here is he laid to whom for daring deed, nor friend nor foe could render worthy meed’

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‘O friend unseen, unborn, unknown Student of our sweet English tongue, I never indulge in poetics – Unless I am down with rheumatics’

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‘No sooner said than done – so acts your man of worth’

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‘A true friend is a friend when in difficulty’

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‘He hath freedom whoso beareth clean and constant heart within’

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